16th Century Wig Dressing

Hello again! Okay so here is the second part of my 16th century historical process – the dressing of the wig.

First a little bit of history:

Hair- At the end of the 16th Century in England, the hairstyles of both middle and upper classes had become more elaborate. Taking inspiration from their Queen  the ladies  chose to curl, dye, and pad out their hair to give the desired colour and shape. Though blonde was the fashionable colour for other countries (a trend that continues today – more hair dyes are in blond shades than any other), the English women of the era were loyal to Queen Elizabeth, and chose to dye their hair red hair was the most popular colour for women. 

The desire to have perfectly cured fiery red hair meant that there was a thriving business in wigs and hair pieces for women unsatisfied with their own natural hair whether is be length colour or thickness.

Rats – Elizabeth herself seems to have favoured curled hair, sometimes padded with “rats” – pads made of hair, shaped to help create the high styles that exemplified the time.  They are called rats because they’re roughly shaped like a rat – pointed on one end (the nose), high and rounded on the other (the haunches of the rat).  Elizabeth continued to wear this style until her death.

To create the typical 16th Elizabeth style, the hair from the ears back was pulled into a neat coiled bun (sometimes braided or padded to give it more bulk), and the hair from the ears forward was styled.  The bun may have been sewn into place with ribbons or thread.  Certainly the tortoise-shell pins of the Victorian era and the bobby pins of the early 20th Century were not known.  Securing the hair by sewing it into place is not as awkward as it sounds; in fact, the bun is more secure and comfortable when sewn in, as there are no pins to slip or dig into the scalp.  There would be no problem sleeping in the bun because most Elizabethans slept sitting propped up by pillows, as they feared.

Process:

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First I began by placing the wig onto a malleable block head – securing it with 5 ‘T’ pins. I placed the pins at the edge of the wig on the centre of the front of the wig, back centre, both sides and one on the very top of the head. It is important to make sure you know how many pins you have placed into the wig as you need to make sure you remove all of them before applying it to your model as this is a health and safety risk. When pinning the wig to the block I had to keep my design idea in mind. As I intend to use a bald cap to create a higher forehead I want to make sure I angle the wig correctly on the block as the style may not sit right on my models head if I styled it in the wrong direction.

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To view a post on making bald caps please click the following link:
https://kathrenelizabethmakeup.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/making-bald-caps/

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(Image source -www.leicestergalleries.com)

I then began researching for reference images. At first I focused on other interpretations of 16th century Queen Elizabeth themed hair. Which was a mistake as it is secondary research. Though it is impossible to gather primary research I can begin by viewing and analysing 16th century portrait paintings of Queen Elizabeth 1st as this is a better reference source as it is more true to what she looked like.

Once I gathered enough images I then began to think about how I would dress the wig to resemble the style I was looking for. As this look is going to be aimed more towards a TV and film I want it to be as accurate as possible therefore I need to carry out lots of research to make sure each aspect of the look is correct.

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To take some of the frizz out of the curls at the front of the wig I wanted to try a pin curling method which has been effective in the past. I drenched the curls with a water spray bottle and rolled them up into pin curls with my fingers before securing them with a flat clip. These clips were perfect as they didn’t dent the curls as some clips may do.

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I then left the curls to dry over night to make sure they had plenty of time to dry thoroughly. I then released the curls carefully – making sure to not tangle them together. The wet set worked really well as it had taken the majority of the frizz out of the curls.

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From looking at my reference images it is clear that in some pictures the hair has a lot of height at the front often in a heart shape or a rounded getting slightly higher in the centre. To recreate this is thought I would need to make padding to pin underneath the front section of the hair however this was not the case. I was able to gently back comb the hair at the root creating my own padding with the hair on the wig. To do this I took small sections and thoroughly back combed them and then used a rolling method to create a bulk at the top of the head.

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This also left me with frizzy ends at the top of the head which I could then dress into the front part of my design. Once I was happy with the volume of the wig I was then able to pin it into place. I used a different technique however. I used a fish tail clip method which is a more permanent way of securing the hair. By bending a clip at the end creates an arrow effect which anchors the pin into the weft of the wig.

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I then began to use the curls in the front to cover the front of the wig to make it look more realistic when it is on my model.

My wig is not complete at this time but I did buy some fancy assessories to add into the wig when I have completed it. I hope to have it finished by next week to then shoot the look in the Easter holidays! I shall keep you posted on how it is all coming together!

Thanks again for visiting! 

Katy x

 

16th Century Make-up (for Film and TV) Practice

Hello! Okay so something a little bit different now, recently I have been working on a 16th Century historical look for one of my portfolio images. I have been practicing all aspects of the look and thought to share the results with you guys! I have done some historical research into the 16th century hair and make-up trends to help me determine a correct historical look. I have also included this research in this post as I found it extremely interesting and somewhat extreme!

As this look is aimed to appeal to clients in the TV and film industry the make-up needs to be historically accurate. To do this I need to make sure my research is solid and relevant. For this task I have made good use of my historical ear file I had created last semester. I was able to recap on my research and try to recreate the make-up by using my products.

Cleanliness- In the summertime people occasionally bathed in the local river however the majority of the time people used to have a ‘strip wash’ which consisted of heating up water in a cauldron which was then splashed over the body, or they would have a ‘dry wash’ by simply rubbing themselves with a clean linen cloth.

Paints and Washes-Pale skin was seen as a sign of wealth – encouraging women to go to extreme lengths to achieve that perfectly pale complexion. Some women were known for swallowing ashes, dust, gravel and coal in order to ‘spoil their stomachs’ to give them a ghostly white face. Most women used a mixture of white lead and vinegar (Ceruse) to achieve the desired pale complexion although that was not without health risks as it was poisonous and could even cause premature death of the wearer. Many people that bathing in their own urine or rosewater mixed with wine was a way to keep the desired complexion where as others such as Diane de Poitier believed that nothing but rain water was the best when it comes to skin care.

Queen Elizabeth I was a huge fan of the bold white lead face paint as it created a high contrast between her red wigs and rouge lips. It was said that Elizabeth applied more paint to her skin as she got older to try and disguise the look of ageing this resulted in her skin being a very rough and unattractive texture due to the toxic white lead.

Egg washes-Egg washes were a way in which women could get a fashionable glaze on the skin then added to the two whites of the eggs along with white sugar and white poppy seeds to create a milky looking liquid. Finally the liquid was then strained through linen to smooth out the texture of the liquid so it could be easily applied to the face.

Rouge– Ochre and Mercuric Sulphide were used to create rouge to be added to the cheeks in various shades. A combination of Cochineal blended with gum Arabic (also used in Egyptian cosmetics) egg whites and fig milk was used to create rouge for the lips.

Eyes – 16th Century eye make-up was not as popular however other materials were used to make the eyes appear more desirable to others for example: Belladonna (also called deadly nightshade) – A poisonous herb was used as eye drops to make the pupils dilate giving a very doe eyed dreamy look. Although popular it was extremely dangerous as Belladonna can cause headaches, migraines and extreme seizures. Overdosing on belladonna could also lead to death.

Patches- Patches were usually made from velvet or taffeta and were used for medicinal purposes as it was thought that applying patches to the temples cured tooth ache. Later patches were seen as a fashionable and became more popular as the contrast between the black dot and the paleness of skin created a high contrast which they thought made their skin appear even paler. Although made fashionable during the end of the 16th century Ancient Romans first invented the use of patches.

Process:

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Base- I first wanted to make sure that I was able to get a good base tone mixed up to create the sort after pale skin. I began by applying a satin primer to try and simulate the egg wash glaze they applied. Starting with a dewy base I was then able to begin adding a white foundation. I chose to use a liquid foundation as they used a white liquid made from egg whites, poppy seeds and white sugar. This was then strained through linen and applied directly onto the face. I used a white foundation from Illamasqua – I began by gradually building up the colour onto the skin using a buffing brush to ensure I didn’t get any brush strokes.

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Cheeks-I then experimented with different blush shapes to determine which was more suited to the era – using my reference images as a guide. On the left the blush is more circular and deliberate. However I prefer the other side as it looks more natural and suited to the character as I feel the left side is nearing towards the 18th century make-up trends. From looking at the research imagery I have gathered. Elizabeth is often depicted with completely pale skin with little or no rouge on her cheeks.

Eyebrows – From looking at my research Elizabeth is often depicted with very fair thin eyebrows.  As I was only experimenting at this point I wanted to try and cover the eye brow to see what effect if give however it was clear that I will need to add more coverage to the brow area if my model has eyebrows similar or thicker than my own. Perhaps cover the brow first using one of the methods the class experimented with at the beginning of the semester. This would also add another skill to the image which I would be able to sell when presenting my final image in my portfolio. However I want to find out what my models natural brows are like as they may not need that much coverage if any at all. Although this would add another skill to the image I think it would be difficult to blend the eye brow into the white foundation as the product would cling to the glue giving the illusion away. Bleaching the eyebrows may be required if my model is willing. This may require further experimentation.

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Eyes – I also experimented with a light brown eye shadow to help define the eye area. Although eye make-up was not popular in the 16th century I thought it would be best to define the eyes ever so slightly to create a contrast between the pale skin and eyes. In the 16th century Belladonna was used to make the eyes appear glistening and innocent. To recreate this I will be using ‘Blink’ eye drops to make the eyes appear twinkly as if affected by Belladonna. I may also be able to simulate some sort of irritation around the eyes as Belladonna was highly poisonous and could lead to severe seizures and possible death if over used. I think this would be a subtle way to make the eyes stand out but for the accurate anatomical reasons.

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(Source of image – http://www.amo-inc.com)

Thanks for reading, I hope you found the reaserach as interesting as I did!

Katy x

Evaluation/Reflection:
Overall I pleased how I was able to use my modern day products to recreate a historical look. I would like to experiment with other products and push this look even further. However I am also working on a wig and costume to complete the look which I think will aid the final look. I will be posting more on this project later today.

Final images from my creative hair assessment

Hi guys! I just got my final images back from photographer Camilla Felgate. She has done such a great job, I’m so pleased with how they have turned out. Make sure to check out her Facebook page to check out the rest of her work its worth a visit, she’s very talented. 🙂

https://www.facebook.com/camillafelgatephotography?fref=ts

So here goes! If you missed the previous posts just click the following link for more information on the background of the character I had chosen and how I created the overall look.

Character: Artemis – Greek goddess of the hunt
Model: Ruthie Holland
Photographer: Camilla Felgate
MUA, hair and costume by me

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Thanks for visiting!
Katy

Bridal Make-up and Hair Assessment

Hello again! For another assessment we were asked to incorporate some form of postiche into a look. I decided on creating a bridal look here is how it all went!

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I wanted to take a different root with this assessment as I wanted to treat my model as if she was a real client paying me to do the make-up for her big day. Instead of creating a look which I thought was a stereo typical bridal look I wanted to find out exactly what my client would like on her wedding day so decided to conduct a questionnaire which would break down what my client wants. From the questionnaire I was then able to put together a look in which my client would be pleased with taking each answer into consideration. I split the questionnaire into three sections: Hair, make-up and general questions. The general questions section contained information that would affect the overall look in a different way for example questions such as ‘Do you intend of traveling to your wedding in an open topped vehicle?’ know the answer to this will let me know if I need to take any extra precautions to keep the hair and make-up stable e.g. setting sprays and hair strays.

To incorporate the postiche into my hair design I wanted to use two strips of weft extensions. To this start out with long strips of real hair wefts which I then cut to size and doubled up for extra thickness. The next step was to stitch the two strips together and then securely stitch on the clips which would then attach to the roots of my clients hair. As I was setting my clients hair with heated rollers I wanted to sure the extensions using a similar method so used rollers but wet set them for a better result. Wet setting would cause less damage to the hair and be more long lasting.

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I wanted to practice before the actual assessment to make sure I can combat any issues I come across during the practice sessions instead of on the day of the assessment. This also allows me to get used to my clients skin and see what makes her look her best when it comes to colour choices and which base to use. After I had carried out some minor adjustments to my hair design and face chart I was ready for the assessment. For example I added another eye shadow which had a slight shimmer to open up the eyes.

On the day of assessment I felt it went quite well however I did have some difficulties with finishing the hair and had to ask for some advice. Once I knew the way around it I was able to complete the hair to a standard I was happy with. The application of the make-up ran smoothly and I was really happy with the blending of the eyes as it had went a lot better than the practice run as it was more flattering on my client.

Overall I am very pleased with this assessment, I feel I have learned some vital tips which will help me improve my special occasion make-up stills.  However, if I was to do the assessment again I would work on the eye brows shaping and colouring as they were uneven and needed warmed up slightly but putting a lighter brown tone through them. I also need to be a little braver when it comes to applying a heavy base. Personally I don’t like to wear a lot of a foundation as it’s not something I personally wear however for a bride they need full coverage on their big day to look as flawless as possible. Another reason for adding a heavier base is to make sure any skin imperfections don’t take away from the features such as the eyes or lips. By creating a flawless base first it allows you to really make these facial features stand out to create a higher contrast. I also need to invest in a higher quality powder that does not clog the skin but can still be used to matte some areas of the face down. These are all tips I will take into consideration when I next complete a bridal or special occasion make-up.

Products Used:

Face:
Once  had cleaned tones and hydrated the skin I applied the following products
Illamasqua matte primer – Buffed gently into the skin
MAC face and body foundation (a mixture of C1 and C5) – I then toughly buffed this into the skin to really push the products into the primer for extra staying power.
Benefit concealer – Applied under the eyes and to anywhere else that needed a little brightening up. I applied this with my ring finger and then blended out with a fluffy brush to ensure an even blend.
15 Concealer Palette – I then used the same method as above to conceal to any other imperfections using the colour corrections theory.

Cheeks:
MAC Bronzer – I applied this like a contour pigment to define the facial features using a fluffy angular contouring brush.
No 7 –
I then applied a small amount of this products just above the bronzer nearing the top of the cheekbones to add a bit more colour to the face
Illamasqua Gleam (Aurora) –
I used this product to highlight the tops of the cheekbones by applying Eyes:
Before applying any products to the eye area I made sure to apply a liberal amount of eye cream to hydrate the skin and make them appear fresher. Eye drops will also contribute.
Eyes:
Benefit Stay Don’t Stray Eye Primer – Apply all over lid with ring finger and blend out all over the lid.
Virgin V Eye shadow (Honeysuckle) – Apply all over the lid using a flat fluffy brush to brighten up the appearance of the eye. This also helps blend out the other colours that are added next.
No7 eye shadow (Weatsheaf)-
Apply into the inner corner of the eye to open them up
Virgin Vie (Beige) – 
Apply into the crease and blend out using a fluffy brush
Virgin Vie (Fawn)– Apply into the outer corner of the crease to define the eye and give it a slightly smokier effect. 
MAC Gel Eyeliner (Black Track)
 –  I then applied a thin line onto upper lash line and halfway on the outer corner of lower lash line to define the eye.
Curl Lashes
Maybelline Colossal Lash (Black)
 – Apply to upper and lower lash lines.
Salon System False lashes (225) – Cut to size and apply to upper lash line to give the eyes more drama

Thanks for visiting my blog!
Katy xx

Making Cloaks For Character Assessments

Hellooo! Well I have already posted about my creative hair project so I thought I might as well tell you all how I made the cloak to complete my characters overall look 🙂 So here is the link to my previous post cause you want to have a little look!
https://kathrenelizabethmakeup.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/creative-hair-final-assessment/

Okay so here goes!

I wanted to incorporate a cloak into my design as she spends a lot of time in woodland areas. I want my character to be wearing a typical Grecian style dress however I that would give her away if she was hiding from her prey. I researched into ways I could make a custom fit cape for my character and found many different patterns in which I could follow. I ended up following a DIY YouTube video that directed me though the full process. I am extremely happy with how it turned out and it only cost me £3 pounds to make in total.

I began by gathering my materials. I visited the local fabric shop and bought two meters of fabric which come to £2.40 from the sale section. The fabric was perfect as it was quite heavy and had a crushed velvet style to it which would give it a more luxury effect.

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I then folded the fabric in half length ways and made a 20” by 17” box from the folder corner and cut it. I then stitched up one of the longer sides to create a hood. I had to make sure it was inside out when I was stitching to make sure I could turn it back on itself to get a neater edge. I then laid the rest of the fabric out and pinned and stitched the hood onto the fabric leaving a 2” overlap of fabric (This would be to thread the ribbon through). I then stitched a tube roughly around 1” thickness which I could thread the ribbon through to act as a draw sting.

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To thread the ribbon I used a small piece of tape and a pencil as this would make it easier to tell where the ribbon is in the tube I had just created. Once I pulled the ribbon all the way through to the other side I was then able to pull the ribbon together tight to make a gathering effect around the collar. I am extremely pleased and proud of how the hooded cloak come together. It didn’t take me as long as expected and looked good of decent quality even though I had no choice but to hand stitch it.

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And this is what it looked like!
2013-12-07 23.02.35This is the same pattern just in a different colour.

Thanks for reading! Hope this helps,

Katy xx

Creative Hair Final Assessment

Hi guys! So, I thought I’d do a post on one of my more recent university assessments. This semester we were asked to do a create hair character piece. I really enjoyed putting it together although it felt like it took me forever! Here is some images and info about the look. Enjoy! kljrfdr

For the task three creative hair assessment I had chosen to look into Greek mythology. I based my look around one Goddess in particular, Artemis – ‘the Goddess of the hunt’. I studied several aspects of the character; how she is commonly depicted, what she symbolises, how she is interpreted in mythological stories and her sacred symbols. All this research helped me build up to my final design. I had based my look on the mythical story of Artemis and Actaeon. Actaeon was caught spying on the virgin Goddess Artemis whilst she was bathing. Furious, Artemis punished Actaeon by turning him into a stag and turning his own hunting dogs against him. I liked the idea of Artemis taking the antlers from Actaeon body and mounted them upon her head as a trophy. To interpret them into the hair I wanted it look like her natural hair had gradually grown around the antlers entwining with her hair.  As for the rest of the hair I had bounced back and forth from different ideas but eventually come to a decision of making the hair look as natural and earthy as possible; incorporating dreadlocks, braids, and matted textured hair. To blend all these aspects together I wanted to incorporate foliage to keep it natural and earthy looking. Another idea I was unsure about what of how I was going to incorporate ‘the Goddess of light’ aspect to my final design. I stumbled across some foliage which had little LED lights entwined through it. I was worried that it was going to look too festive and out of place however when I tried it out on myself I really liked the effect. Also I thought it would be good for a theatrical performance as it would be really interesting on stage.

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For the make-up I wanted to create something strong yet graceful and natural. I decided to emphasis the eyes to highlight her fierce eyes as she stalks her prey whilst hunting. As my look was for theatre I wanted to take what I had learned from the first year and do a full coverage and a heavy contour, making the facial features stand out. As for the colours I wanted to stick the earthy colour scheme so I decided to use a mauve colour alongside a deep burgundy to compliment the green in the costume and hair.

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I wanted to make a full costume for my character to complete the look. I visited the local fabric shop and bought two meters of cream fabric to make a wraparound Grecian style dress and two meters of thick earthy green fabric to make into a cloak. I looked at several tutorials to figure out how to stitch it together as best I could. I was really pleased with how the costume came out as I feel the fabrics were suited to my design. I also wanted to make a bow and arrow prop as the one I had ordered online was not suitable for my character as it looked to cartoon like so I made my own from sticks and parcel sting. I also used left over straps of fabric to act as the riser it also makes the bow look more decorative. I thought the prop worked really well as it give my model something to work with on the shoot.

On the day of assessment I was fully prepped and ready to put my look together as I had had a few dress rehearsals at home. I first began by braiding the two sides of the hair and pulling the rest of the hair back to keep it out of the way whilst I was doing the make-up. The application of the make-up went really well as I was extremely pleased with it. However I did struggle on the lip colour as the product I had practiced with did not suit my model so I had to improvise and I was not entirely happy with the shade I had chosen. I would perhaps use a plump shade as opposed to a pink however this may clash with the eye make-up.

As for the head piece I found it harder to secure it onto my model although I had made the size of the head piece adjustable to allow it to fit properly. I would like to have used stronger wire to make the antlers more stable as they moved when my model shook her head although they were secured onto her head well they still had too much movement for my liking.

I received positive feedback however I need to work on choosing a lip colour to fit my design. Also I think I should have tried to disguise the plastic foliage with natural leaves to try and make it less fake looking however, fake foliage would most likely be used in theatre for easiness as it can be reused and stays the same which is good for continuity. I did try doing the look with dead autumn coloured leaves however it looked too bland so I think the green adds the pop of colour it needed. Overall I am pleased with how my final look come together as I was happy with the overall look; hair, make-up, props and costume. I managed my time well as it took me exactly two hours to complete the look and was on time for my photo-shoot slot.

Products used (Make-up):

Face:
Illamasqua Matte Primer – Buffed into cleansed and tones skin
MAC studio tech NC15– Buffed into the skin to warm up the skin tone a considerable amount this product also gives a full coverage flawless cover.
Kryolan Greasepaint supra color pallet (7W, Ng1, NG2) – Apply a dark brown to create a heavy contour down the side of the nose under the chin, cheek bones and jaw and blend into the neck. Also work a little of dark brown under the tip of the nose and into the temples and around the forehead to give the face definition.
Kryolan Greasepaint supra color pallet (1W, 3W)– Light peachy tones to use as highlighter on the top of the cheeks and jaw line, across the forehead down the nose and on the chin. Emphasis the eyebrows by using a lighter tone above the outer part of the brow and on the brow bone.
No 7 blusher (Coral Flush) – Apply small amount on top of the dark contour with a fluffy blush brush
Illamasqua gleam (Aurora) – Buff a small amount onto the tops of the cheekbones
Illamasqua Translucent Powder – Press onto skin using powder puff

Eyes:
Benefit Stay Don’t Stray- Apply evenly all over lid as a base
MAC orb – Apply all over the lid with flat fluffy brush to brighten up the eye
MAC Embark – pat onto the crease and blend out with fluffy brush. Bring the product down the side of the nose and out into the temple to create a winged eye effect. Add more if needed to darken the eyes further.
Body shop Iced body powder (apricot) – Apply under the inner corners of the eyes
No7 eye shadow (weatsheaf) apply to centre of the lid and in the inner corners of the eyes to open them uo
Barry M eyeliner cream – apply to lower waterline
Maybelline Colossal Lash (Black) Apply to upper and lash lines

Brows:
Use a spooly to brush the natural brows upwards. Then apply a clear mascara to keep the hairs in place. Once happy with the placement of the brows fill in with colour suitable for model I intend to use MAC eye shadows in Era and Concrete.

Lips:
MAC Lip liner (whirl) – define lips up to the natural lip line
Benefit (nice knickers) apply to the centre of lips

Thanks for visiting my blog!  Merry Christmas!
Katy x

Postiche – Facial Hair Final Assessment

Hi guys! So recently I have been really busy completing media make-up assessments so I thought I’d right a quick description for our first task for those of you that may be interested! For our first media task we were asked to construct a hand knotted facial hair piece that we then had to apply onto a male model. Here is some images of my final assessment including how I applied and removed the facial Postiche, the products I used and a evaluation of how it all went!

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Products used:
Face:
-Illamasqua, matte primer – Apply all over the skin using a flat foundation brush.
-Glynn Mckay, bruse gel (red) – Stipple a small amount onto the cheeks with orange stippling sponge and blend the product into the skin to give the appearance of rosier cheeks, This will also give the appearance of broken blood vessels under the skins surface to age the skin slightly.
Moustache:
-The first step to applying the moustache is to ensure the skin is grease free by gently applying a toner in a sweeping motion.
-Next apply a matte spirit gum to the skin and tap it with your finger until the surface becomes sticky.
-Once the spirit gum is sticky enough place the moustache into place and press it down with a damp cloth or sponge.

Applying:

  • The first step to applying the moustache is to ensure the skin is grease free by gently applying a toner in a sweeping motion.
  • Next apply a matte spirit gum to the skin and tap it with your finger until the surface becomes sticky.
  • Once the spirit gum is sticky enough place the moustache into place and press it down with a damp cloth or sponge.
  • Once applied comb and style the moustache as desired.

Removing:

  • Using a mild spirit gum remover or surgical spirit on a brush gently work away at the edges of the lace until each edge comes loose.
  • Gently peel away the moustache
  • Use the same product to remove the remainder of the spirit gum from the skin
  • To clean the moustache  and lace use small amount of acetone
  • Then the moustache is ready to be reused

Postiche (Task one) Evaluation:
At first I struggled with the hair knotting however the more I knotted the quicker and neater I got. At first I was not able to knot hair flat as it would often stick up which would result in an unrealistic effect. However I was able to adjust my technique to drag the hair down into the right direction to make the knot sit flat against the lace. After I was happy with the knotting technique I began knotting my moustache. I tried to make the notes as small as possible to make it look more natural on the skin. I had noticed that surprisingly the blonde knots were more visible so I had to make sure to mix a strand of brown in with each not to break it up a little bit. I was surprised how quickly the moustache came together as I knotted at two to three hours at a time.

I originally didn’t want to put any make-up on my model as any natural dark circles or skin imperfections would only add to the look of my character. However I did decide on using a matte primer which would eliminate any shine which will be beneficial when I take the final photographs. I also looked into skin conditions such as rosacea and thread veins to try and age my character to make it look a little rougher around the edges. However the product that I had chosen to use (Glynn Mckay bruise gel in red) was not suitable as it give a healthy flush to the cheeks making him look more youthful which was the opposite of what I wanted. If I was to do this again I would experiment with different products and colours to get a better result. Maybe introduce some different colours such as purples and maybe even a little blue to give more depth. Skin illustrators may also be a better product to use as you can gradually build up the colour without it looking like it laid on the surface of the skin.

Applying the moustache to my model was surprisingly easy as it fitted him perfectly as I had used the pattern I had taken of his face. To find out the best way to apply the moustache I carried out some research which helped me. The moustache adhered really well as I had rolled a clean brush handle over the spirit gum to make the surface sticker. Overall apart from the bruise gel application I am really pleased with the overall application of the moustache and the general look of my character.

Thanks for visiting my blog! 

Katy xx

Cutting and Styling My Hand Knotted Facial Postiche

Hi everyone! I’ve finally finished knotting my moustache facial postiche!! Couldn’t be happier to have finally completed it! Thought I’d run you guys through the next few steps of cutting and styling it. Stay tuned if your interested!

Once the moustache was completely knotted I then removed the block points from the wooden board with pliers. I then used T pins to secure the lace onto a malleable block ready for styling.

2013-11-13 15.44.50I firstly removed some of the length of the knotted hair as it was far too long.  I then began to make angular cuts to gradually shorten the length without leaving a harsh line. Whilst cutting my I kept referring back to my reference images to help me cut it into the desired shape.

2013-11-13 15.37.56I made sure not to cut it too short at this stage because I wanted to use heated appliances to give the hair a little more volume and shape making it more realistic looking. I used small barrelled metal curling tongs that conducted the heat from the tong heater. I found this really difficult at first as I found them really unpredictable. The tongs did not stay at a set heat as they would cool down the more they were left out of the heater. They would also get too hot at times when they had been left in the heater too long. To test the temperature of the tongs before using them I rubbed them on the edge of the lace to see if they caused any singing if they did I would leave them to cool down before using them on my moustache.

2013-11-13 15.44.54I had to keep any Health and safety issues in mind as the tong handles could get extremely hot which would easily burn your hands if handled incorrectly.

1471317_10151987308639339_485308927_nOnce I was happy with the curl and cut of the moustache I was then able to use a small amount of moustache wax to hold the style in place and flatten down any unwanted fly away hairs. Before applying the moustache I cut down the lace down leaving roughly around two bars of lace around the edges.

Then its ready to apply! 😄

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Thanks for reading guys! Stay tuned for some images from my postiche final assessment!

Katy x

Bridal Make-up Practice

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For an assessment for media make-up and postiche we have been asked to incorporate a realistic looking false hair piece into a look. I have decided to do a bridal look which will allow me to also practice bridal make-up to add to my portfolio to show to potential clients. For this I will be working on the beautiful Bex. To help me thought this task I have decided to treat Bex as a real paying customer so i intent to go through the process of asking her lots of questions to try and determine what she exactly has in mind for her big day in the future. I thought it would be quite a fun take on the task given.

I asked Bex what sort of look she would like on her wedding day. I also asked her to pick out some reference images so I could get a better idea of what style she likes. I did this for both the hair and make-up to make sure I get the overall look correct.

Rather than asking her ‘what make-up would you like?’ I broke the questions down; ‘What base would you like, a matte finish? A natural finish? Or maybe a dewy skin glowyskin? How much coverage do you like? Are you comfortable wearing false eyelashes? How much make-up do you usually wear? How is your skin recently?’ and so on..  This broke it down into specific aspects I could incorporate into my final design.

As for the base Bex had decided on a natural skin tone that was borderline dewy. So instantly I knew I wanted to use a matte primer combined with MAC face and body as this has quite a natural finish but can be matted down in particular areas such as the centre of the forehead and down the bridge of the nose as I don’t want her skin to look greasy or flash back on pictures.

Bex originally wanted a natural looking eye; however she did like a look of some of the brown smoky eyes I had previously shown her for reference. I wanted to incorporate these together to come up with the correct tones of brown to give the desired depth and definition.

For the lips, Bex liked a slightly rosier lip that didn’t look too overpowering. During the test run I tried a few different colours on her to see which one she liked the best and which one complimented the rest of the make-up.

For this test run I wanted to have a play around with different products to see which suited her skin. The questionnaire I had asked Bex to fill helped me out a lot as I was able to work around her skin type and adjust the products I used.

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Products Used
Face:

Once  had cleaned tones and hydrated the skin I applied the following products
Illamasqua matte primer – Buffed gently into the skin
MAC face and body foundation (a mixture of C1 and C5) – I then toughly buffed this into the skin to really push the products into the primer for extra staying power.
Benefit concealer – Applied under the eyes and to anywhere else that needed a little brightening up. I applied this with my ring finger and then blended out with a fluffy brush to ensure an even blend.
15 Concealer Palette – I then used the same method as above to conceal to any other imperfections using the colour corrections theory.

Cheeks:
MAC Bronzer – I applied this like a contour pigment to define the facial features using a fluffy angular contouring brush.
No 7 –
I then applied a small amount of this products just above the bronzer nearing the top of the cheekbones to add a bit more colour to the face
Illamasqua Gleam (Aurora) –
I used this product to highlight the tops of the cheekbones by applying it with a medium sized fluffy brush and blending it well into the skin to avoid a streaky look.

Eyes:
Before applying any products to the eye area I made sure to apply a liberal amound of eye cream to hydrate the skin and make them appear fresher. Eye drops will also contribute.
Benefit Stay Don’t Stray Eye Primer – Apply all over lid with ring finger and blend out all over the lid.
Virgin V Eye shadow (honeysuckle) – Apply all over the lid using a flat fluffy brush to brighten up the appearance of the eye. This also helps blend out the other colours that are added next.
Virgin Vie (Beige) –
Apply into the crease and blend out using a fluffy brush
Virgin Vie (Fawn)– Apply into the outer corner of the crease to define the eye and give it a slightly smokier effect.
MAC Gel Eyeliner (Black Track)
–  I then applied a thin line onto upper lash line and halfway on the outer corner of lower lash line to define the eye.
Curl Lashes
Maybelline Colossal Lash (Black)
– Apply to upper and lower lash lines.
Salon System False lashes (225) – Cut to size and apply to upper lash line to give the eyes more drama

Lips:
Vaseline –
Apply with ring finger all over lips to ensure they are hydrated. If needed apply a lip scrub to eliminate dry skin which could be detrimental to the final look of the lip.
MAC lip liner (Whirl) – Neatly line and then fill in the lips to create a good base for the lipstick giving it more staying power.
Body shop Lipstick (7) – Use a lip brush to neatly apply the colour all over the lips.

Thanks for reading!
Katy x

Evaluation/ Reflection:
Overall I am very pleased with this look however I have ordered some slightly shimmery eye pigments which I want to test out as Bex’s eyes could do be with being brightened up a little more. We also decided that individual false lashes would be a better option as opposed to strip lashes as they give a much more natural effect. I also want to apply a light lip gloss to freshen up the look making it a little more youthful.

Basic Pattern Making For Postiche

In today’s Postiche lesson we were taught the basics. We started by making a pattern using plastic wrap (cling film) and sticky tape. This was really cheap and easy to do.

KathrenElizabethmake-up

First we began by cutting strips of sticky tape in preparation for the next step. We then laid a piece of plastic wrap under the models nose making sure not to obstruct the nostrils. I then asked my model to hold it in place so I was able to place strips of tape over the plastic wrap to strengthen it. This would also help the plastic take the shape of my models face.

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Once I was satisfied with the strength of the plastic I then used a black marker to draw out the shape of my models lips. I also drew on two dots to locate the position of the nostrils. I then roughly drew out a mustache (as this was only a practice, I’d be a bit more precise in future).

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This technique then allows you to cut around your design and use it as a guide when making your prostiche.

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Thats it, its done.  Told you it was easy!
Stay tuned for my next post on making a start on hand knotting hair for a postiche pieces.

Thanks for visiting! 

Katy x

Reflection / Evaluation:
This technique ran smoothly however if I was to do this again I would perhaps use more strips of tape the strengthen the pattern before removing it from my models face. I would have also drawn on the mustache a little neater but as this was just a practice it didn’t matter too much. To get it more symmetrical I could draw one side of the mustache and then fold the pattern in half and copy it to the other side as the cling film is see through.