Preparation The Sculpt – Flashing / Releasing Agents

Hi everyone! I thought I’d share a great tip I have learned this week during my special effects lesson. A simple method that prevents thick edges on an appliance. A method called ‘flashing’: DSCF0244 Flashing is term used to describe a technique that prevents thick edges during the casting of a mould. A layer of Plasterline is applied to the positive framing the sculpt leaving a gap (roughly just under 1cm) creating a moat like effect around the entire circumference sculpt. When fibreglass is layered over the sculpt the moat will be filled making it tighter allowing the foam latex to drain creating a thinner edge as the mould will be tighter in this area. Flashing also aids undercuts as you are able to smooth out difficult surfaces such as the inner ear and around the nose area. DSCF0228 I made sure to leave the keys clear from Plasterline as this would aid the alignment of the mould when casting. Once the flashing was complete I was then able to move onto the next stage. Releasing agents: DSCF0247 Before applying fibreglass onto the sculpt I had to take precautions to stop it sticking to the Plasterline as this would make it extremely difficult to clean. I first applied a thick coverage of silver vinyl removable coating. Using a coloured vinyl coating helps identify it on the positive as I will be able to see if I have missed out any parts of the sculpt. I made sure to spray the vinyl coating under the extractor fan as a health and safety precaution so myself and my class mates do not breathe in the areole. I then left it to dry for around ten minutes. DSCF0250 Next I added two coats of ‘Macwax’ wax releasing agent as a further precaution – leaving it to dry for ten minutes in between each coat. Now that the sculpt is protected I can now move onto the next step. Completing the fiberglass mould! Stay Tuned! Thanks for reading, Katy x 

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