Third Degree Burn (Liquid Latex / Cotton Wool / Kryolan Grease Paint B Pallet)

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First I began by using a latex sponge to stipple liquid latex onto the skin. Once this was dry I added a second layer however I did not allow this layer to dry as I wanted a sticky surface for the next step. I split a couple of cotton pads into two and stuck them fluffy side down on top of the wet latex. I then waited for a few seconds to allow the latex to soak into the cotton wool to make sure the fluffy texture would adhere to the liquid latex.

Next I then used the same latex sponge I used earlier to stipple another layer of latex over the top of the cotton wool to get rid of any fluffy edges before I begin to add paint. Whilst the latex was wet I used the end of my brush to move the cotton around to create further texture. I then used a hair dryer to speed up the drying process and then began to apply paint once the latex was completely dry as latex can be very harmful to brushes.

I first began with red (079) greasepaint from the Kryolan B palette to fill in what would be the deepest parts of the burn. I also added a small amount of maroon (082) to the same areas to give depth. I then added a yellow (303) to imitate the less severely burnt skin and black (071) to create the look of charred skin that has been partly burnt away. I also used the same colour to work around the wound to create the look of soot. The final touch was to add KY Jelly to the middle area of the wound which makes the burn look oozing and fresh.

Thanks for reading 🙂

Katy xx

Mangled Thumb – Grimas Derma Wax & Glynn McKay Bruise Gel

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 To create a mangled looking thumb I used Grimas Derma Wax (around £9) and Glynn Mckay Dark Red Bruise Gel (around £7). First I began by scraping a small amount of the wax out of the pot by using my nail. This allows the wax to become thinner making it easier to work with. Next I started building a layer of the wax onto my thumb being careful not to distort the shape of the thumb too much as I want it to look as realistic as possible.

Once I was happy with the layering of the wax I then blended it into the skin by dabbing my finger around the edges to make the line between my own skin and the wax less visible. I found that using a wet wipe or slightly dampening my fingertips also helps with the blending as the wax can become very sticky as the bodies temperature softens and melts it slightly.
Next I began moulding the lacerations and cuts.

What’s the difference between a laceration and a cut?
-A laceration is a tear or deep cut of the flesh which is most likely to need stitches as this controls bleeding and reduces the scar tissue making it less noticeable once the laceration is healed.
-I cut tends to be shallower and less severe for example a paper cut.

For the mangled thumb I will be using a mixture of cuts and lacerations to make it look like a severe injury. The tool I will be using is a simple tooth pick as they are thin and sharp enough to scrape through the wax without damaging the skin underneath, making it an extremely practical, cheap  and disposable too to use for this technique. I simply dragged the tooth pick through the wax from underneath the nail in a downwards motion. This worked really well as I had a generous amount of wax on that area so it give me a really deep looking laceration. On the front of the thumb I wanted to try making it look like a chunk of skin had been lifted. For this I repeated the same technique however this time I created a small pocket between my own skin and the wax by lifting the wax from the skin slightly. This also worked well as the Grimas Derma wax mimics the skin making it look realistic.

Once I was happy with the manipulation of the wax I then used a dark red bruise gel to add a bloody stain over parts of the wax making it look raw and painful. Finally I used a small flat brush to push the gel into the crevices building up the depth of each cut and laceration. You could also use the fake blood recipe to fill in the cuts however I used bruise gel as it Is alcohol based which then evaporates making the blood look slightly coagulated.
Make your own fake blood:  https://kathrenelizabethmakeup.wordpress.com/2012/10/20/fake-blood/

 

Prominent Veins

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This is a really easy way to create prominent looking veins by only using two cream colours from the Kryolan Supra Color B Palette which costs around £25. First I used the deep blue (091) to draw out the main shape of the veins I then added little bits of the grey (512) to tone down the harshness of the blue. For this technique I used a dry brush method that enabled me to blend the product into the skin by simply rubbing the brush over the surface to blend any harsh lines making it look more realistic.

Creating New and Old Bruises using Glynn McKay Bruise Gel

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What is a bruise? 

A bruise is a mild case of internal bleeding, it is coursed by trauma or damage to the body. The blood capillaries then burst under the skins surface this tends to change the colour of the skin as the blood seeps to the surface. Bruising can also occur on muscle and bone which can be extremely painful.

New or fresh bruises tend to be a lot more pigmented as the blood is fresher and darker as there is still oxygen in the blood however the blood loses this oxygen eventually as it is not being pumped through the heart therefore it is not being refreshed. As the blood loses its oxygen it begins to rot under the skin resulting in a colour change from reds, blues and purples to yellows, greens and browns. Having knowledge on bruising can be very helpful to a makeup artist as it allows the artist to track and follow the changes to the colours of the bruise over time so they are able to make it more believable for example on a TV series the bruising may have to fade away slowly over time as the episodes progress as bruises don’t heal overnight.

Creating a New Bruise with Bruise Gels

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To begin I started with the light red bruise gel and gently blended a small amount onto the skin. Once I was happy with the shape and depth of colour of the red I then added a small amount of blue to really make the bruise have more depth making it look that little bit more painful. Again I blended the colour into the skin and tried to keep the shape abstract. Next I added a little bit of the purple bruise gel to add even more depth to the bruise, this gives the appearance of broken capillaries when not blended too much. Once again I used a wet wipe to clear away some of the outer blending to make it look more abstract and realistic. The texture of the bruise gels is totally different to the bruise wheel as it has more of a stick consistency and it goes a lot further as you only need little amounts applied at a time. Personally I preferred using the bruise gels for the new bruise as I felt it sunk into the skin making it look more realistic.

Creating an Old Bruise using Bruise Gel

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For this I began with the yellow bruise gel and added it onto the skin building up the colour. Next I introduced the brown gel which toned down the yellow making it look more realistic. Then I added the green on top to blend in with the other colours giving it definition. Once I was happy with the blending and depth of the green I added a tiny amount of blue and purple to give it more depth. Overall I am happy with the outcome of the product as I fell it works well and is it looks believable when applied.

Creating New and Old Bruises using Kryolan Bruise Wheel

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What is a bruise? – A bruise is a mild case of internal bleeding, it is coursed by trauma or damage to the body. The blood capillaries then burst under the skins surface this tends to change the colour of the skin as the blood seeps to the surface. Bruising can also occur on muscle and bone which can be extremely painful.

New or fresh bruises tend to be a lot more pigmented as the blood is fresher and darker as there is still oxygen in the blood however the blood loses this oxygen eventually as it is not being pumped through the heart therefore it is not being refreshed. As the blood loses its oxygen it begins to rot under the skin resulting in a colour change from reds, blues and purples to yellows, greens and browns. Having knowledge on bruising can be very helpful to a makeup artist as it allows the artist to track and follow the changes to the colours of the bruise over time so they are able to make it more believable for example on a TV series the bruising may have to fade away slowly over time as the episodes progress as bruises don’t heal overnight.

Creating a New Bruise with Kryolan Bruise Wheel

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First I started dabbing the lighter purple onto the skin, blending it gently into the skin to create and abstract shape (as bruises don’t tend to be perfect circles). Next I introduced the red from the palette using the same technique however I only added small amounts at a time. I then applied the darkest of the purples to the skin to give it more depth. Throughout this process I had to remind myself to keep the shape abstract to make it as realistic as possible. When adding the darker purple I did not blend it as well as the others as I wanted it to look like broken capillaries underneath the skins surface. After I had applied the colours and I was happy with the depth of the bruise the then wiped away certain parts with a wet wipe to make it even more abstract as my edges were too rounded and smooth. The wet wipe can also be used for clearing up mistakes throughout the application process. Overall I think this effect works well as it had enough definition to show up in picture but did not look too dramatic or false.

Creating a Old Bruise with Kryolan Bruise Wheel

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For this I began with the lightest of the greens in the wheel and gently applied it to the skin building up the colour by dabbing and pushing the colour around. Next I added the darker green to give it a bit more definition. I still had to make sure I was sticking with the abstract shapes to make it realistic. to add more definition I added a little black and blended well. Overall I liked this method of creating an old bruise as it blended well and the outcome looks believable.

Fake Blood!

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First I began by pouring all of the toffee sauce into a clean bottle. Then I added half a bottle of red food colouring a tea spoon of yellow and a few drops of green shaking the mixture in between each colour. The red adds the typical red colour of blood, the yellow indicates the plasma and the green adds depth. This recipe is also edible and does not stain skin or clothing which makes it extremely practical. Give it a try and let me know how it goes! =]

Matte Flawless Skin with Classic Red Lip

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After cleansing, toning and applying a light moisturiser to the skin I applied a matte illamasqua primer which I worked into the skin with a large buffing brush. Once I was happy with the application of the primer I then applied MAC Studio tech (NC15) using the same method. I had to work quickly as the studio tech settles into the skin as it is a matte foundation making it harder to go back and rework.  If the clients skin has prominent vellus facial hair I have to make sure that I used a downwards motion to keep the fine hairs neat. I brought the foundation past the jaw line to blend the foundation down onto the neck to avoid any harsh lines.

Next to aid the flawless base I applied MAC NW20 concealer to any imperfections or blemished. For this I used a 1/2 inch flat brush. I built up the concealer in layers around the eyes to disguise any dark circles. I also brought the concealer up to the water line to cover of any discolouration under the eye. I also used a little amount on the brow bone and eye lid to make the face a complete blank canvas.

Once I was happy with the foundation base and concealer I then used illamasqua loose powder to further matte the skin. For this I used a MAC powder puff which I then rolled into the powder and applied to the face using a gentle rolling action which pushes the product into the face with minimum fall out.  I then applied the same powder under the eyes using a broad flat brush which allowed me to get into the eye socket to make sure the concealer was set into place to avoid movement of the product. Before applying the powder around the eye I had to make sure the concealer hadn’t creased as it can melt due to the body temperature.

For the lips I used a MAC lip liner (Cherry) to outline the natural shape of the lips and used a Rimmel Kate Moss lipstick (111 Kiss of life) to fill in the lips to create the classic red matte lip.

Finally I added a small amount of blush to the apples of the cheeks to add a bit more colour as I had eliminated any redness from my models face. I finally finished off the look like a coat of black Maybelline Colossal lash mascara.

This look would be an ideal base for a 1950’s inspired makeup.

No Makeup Look – Dewy Skin

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For this look I began by cleansing and toning the skin as this gives me a good clear base to work with. I want this look to be very subtle almost as if my model is not wearing any makeup at all. After cleansing and toning I worked Illamasqua Satin primer into the skin by doing small circular movements with a buffing brush. I also buffed the foundation past the jaw line to ensure that the foundation was well blended down the neck to avoid harsh lines.

Once I was happy with the application of the primer I then tested my clients skin tone by carrying out a simple swatch test on the lower jaw of my model. This allowed me to see which of the foundations would suit my clients skin tone as I wanted this look to be as natural as possible. Once I had found a match I applied (C1 MAC face and body) foundation to the skin in a similar manor to the primer however this time I had to make sure my clients ears also had I light coverage of the same foundation this  is especially important in TV work as the face has to match the rest of the body.

 Next I applied MAC NW20 concealer with a light medium sized flat brush to dark circles around the eyes. I also added small amounts around the face to even out any imperfections or blemishes.

Finally to finish the look I used a clean disposable mascara brush to neaten up the eyebrows using an eyebrow gel.

Cleansing, Toning and Moisturising

First I began by taking the majority of makeup off my models face with a face wipe that caters for all skin types as I want to avoid irritation to my models skin.  Next I applied a sensitive cleansing lotion to the skin to further remove the makeup. I had to make sure I really worked the lotion into the skin as I wanted to have a clean blank canvas in order to apply a dewy no makeup look. Next I used a damp cotton pad to remove the lotion (its better to have a damp cotton pad as it is less rough on the skin but still has light exfoliation properties).

Next I wanted to remove my models eye makeup so I first began with dampening 3-4 cotton pads with a sterile water spray (once again to soften the surface of the cotton pad and to also make the product go further as the cotton pad will not absorb all the product.)  I then split a cotton pad in half to allow me to work under the eyes without it being uncomfortable for my model. (this also saves money in the long run). Next I then folded the thinner cotton pads in half again and added a little amount of eye makeup remover onto them. I also added eye makeup remover onto 2 other damp cotton pads to ensure I could remove the makeup as quickly as possible and not have to go back and forth applying more makeup remover to cotton pads. Next I placed the folded pads underneath the bottom lash line and asked my model to gently close their eyes to ensure I don’t get any product into their eyes from carrying out the next step (this prevents any smudges under the lower lash line and cheek.) I then gently pressed the cotton pads onto the lid and rested it there for a short period of time to soften the eye makeup which would make it easier to remove. Next I used the same cotton pad and in a downwards motion I began to remove the makeup catching the excess on the bottom cotton pad which is still placed under the lower lash line. Once I was happy that I had removed as much of the eye makeup as possible I then removed the cotton pads from under the eyes.

Next I used cotton buds dampened with eye makeup remover to remove the makeup from the lower lash line and underneath the eye as I want to make sure there are no visible traces of previously applied makeup. I also used a cotton bud to remove the makeup from the top lash line my lifting the eye lid up whilst my model closed her their eyes this allows better access to the lash line in order for my to remove all traces of makeup.

Finally I used a clean damp cotton pad to quickly wipe over the skin near the eye area in case of any smudges from the removal of the eye makeup. Then I toned the skin by using damp cotton pads and a sensitive toner which I applied gently all over the skin avoiding the eye area. Toning the skin will remove any residue from the cleanser along with balancing the skins PH levels. Finally I added a light moisturiser to the skin, however this may not always be the case as depending on the clients skin type, for example; if a client has an oily skin type their skin already generates the natural oils needed to prevent the skin from drying out. If a client has particularly dry flaky skin I would maybe also use a light exfoliant followed by the moisturiser to make the skins surface subtle and easier to work with as products are less likely to go patchy and cling to the dry skin.